recreation
Below you can see listed all of the Breeders registered with the Purebred Sheep Breeders Association of Nova Scotia who breed recreation.

Little Liscomb Run Paddle Route

From Sherbrooke, travel west along Highway 7 approximately 14 km to Little Liscomb Road. Turn left onto the road and continue along the shoreline approximately 2.5 km to the wharf road on the right. Launch from the small sand beach next to the government wharf.

Special Features:

This tour of Little Liscomb Harbour gives you the opportunity to explore the coves and islands situated at the mouth of Liscomb Harbour. Hemloe Island, approximately 1 km from the wharf, is currently under development. The area is now occupied only by seasonal residents, and is a far cry from the large number of buildings including homes, a school and grocery store, which were located here in the early 1900’s. Liscomb Island once housed two light keepers and their families. Today, only the remains of the former light station, and a pioneer cemetery, mark where former island inhabitants kept watch. Beyond Pye Point in Spanish Ship Bay, there is a large mussel farm. Aquaculture is now a large part of the marine industry. It is rumoured that Captain Kidd explored these waters, leaving behind a carving of his name on a rock in Gaspereau Brook. Fish in this area include sea trout, salmon and mackerel. Cranes, loons and other waterfowl can be seen and heard along the shoreline. Along the outer coasts of Liscomb Island, you may be fortunate to see whales or dolphins.

Length: 20 km return [Needs Review]
Time: 7 hours
Type: Tidal, saltwater, ocean
Facilities: None
Nearby: Village of Sherbrooke
Rating: Intermediate

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Little Liscomb RunLeaving Little Liscomb wharf, cross the harbour and paddle south towards Hemloe Island. Once you reach the island, it is best to follow the shoreline on the eastern side of the island, exploring the coves and terrain along the way. On your left is a very small rock island, called Hog Island. Keeping the island to your left, travel between Hemloe Island and Hog Island, bringing into view of the northwest tip of Liscomb Island. This tip is aptly named Gravel Point, and is a long, low strip of land occupied only by sea birds, and used primarily as nesting grounds. Continue paddling along the northern shore of Liscomb Island, where you soon arrive at a cove that housed the boathouse and ramp used by the light keepers to travel to and from the island. Remnants of the breakwater protecting this cove are still apparent. On the return trip head back to the wharf where you began your paddle. Please note that in times of inclement weather the water in this harbour can be rough and caution should be exercised.


Country Harbour to Bezanson’s Beach Paddle Route

From the TC 104, take Exit 35 at Lower South River just past Antigonish. Following Route 316 to Goshen turn left at the intersection. Travel 22 km along route 316 to Country Harbour. Once there look for a steel bridge on the right side of the road, the perfect place to put your boat in the water.

Special Features:

Country Harbour is one of Canada’s deepest natural harbours, and was home to some of the earliest settlers to Guysborough County. A group of United Empire Loyalists landed in this area in the late 1700’s and chose Mount Misery, a large looming peak over the harbour, as their first place of residence. It is a name that aptly describes their experience in this place and is echoed by the German gun ship that during WWII is said to have steamed its way into this harbour and promptly turned around and left. A popular route currently being reconstructed in this area was originally traversed by Loyalists. You can also visit Salsman Provincial Park, Carding Mill Brook waterfalls, and a cable drawn ferry that operates year round.

Length: 34 km return
Time: 2 days
Type: Tidal, saltwater harbour
Facilities: Campground, picnic tables, garbage cans, toilets, payphone, fire pits
Nearby: Country Harbour, Stormont
Rating: Intermediate

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Country HarbourFrom the iron bridge in Country Harbour, paddle toward the narrows of the harbour. Along this portion of the route you will drift past high cliffs as you approach Widow Point. Once there you may encounter some dense seaweed at low tide and caution should be exercised. Continuing on you will arrive at Salsman Provincial Park, which is an excellent place to stop for lunch, have a campfire or stay the night. In this area you may witness bald eagles, hawks and falcons soaring above. In the small cove surrounding the park you may stop and explore Hog Island and Long Island, beyond which, you will come to Halletts Point. Cook Cove and Freemans Cove are also along this route and are great secluded areas to venture into and explore. Just before reaching the site of the historic Loyalist settlement you will encounter Wilson Island and Leggatte Point. Continuing on, you will pass Mount Misery on your right, one of the highest elevations along this route. Next you will pass the cable drawn ferry that transports vehicles from one side of the harbour to the other. You must use caution when passing the ferry. Nearing the end of this route the harbour will begin to widen as you approach its mouth. You will land at beautiful Bezansons Beach that is nestled along the shore of Harbour Point.


Sherbrooke to Sonora Paddle Route

From the TC 104, take exit 32 at Lower West River and follow Highway 7 to historic Sherbrooke Village. Once there, follow the dirt road that leads you behind the site of the living history museum. You will arrive at an intersection. Stay to the right and you will soon come upon the site of the St. Marys Boat Club boat launch where you may put your boat in the water.

Special Features:

Sherbrooke has a vast and rich cultural history. The village recreation depicts typical village life during the mid 1800’s in Nova Scotia and is the largest museum site in the province. Sherbrooke was built on an economy of ship building, lumbering and gold mining, and was at it’s height during the Guysborough County industrial boom of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Along this route you will journey along the famous St. Marys River to its mouth at Sonora, allowing you to step back in time as you gain a close view of old abutments, rock walls, and remnants of the past industrial practices of the region.

Length: 12 km, one way
Time: 5.5 Hours
Type: Tidal, salt and freshwater river
Facilities: None
Nearby: Sherbrooke
Rating: Intermediate

Description:

Visit Guysbrorough: Sherbrooke to SonoraFrom the St. Marys boat launch paddle to your left and follow this narrow portion of the river around a point of land. Here, the water is brown and murky, typical of fresh water rivers in Nova Scotia. The river meanders, and the surrounding shore consists of evergreen trees and plush mossy banks. Once around the first prominent point of land you will be in much more open water. Buoys along this route, mark the deepest channel of the river and it is important to stay in this channel, as there are shallow areas and large boulders under the surface. As you continue on you will pass cabins and year round residences. Looking closely, you will see the remains of a bygone era in the form of old boom wharves and rock walls that at one time were integral to the logging industry in the area. This is the widest part of the St. Marys River and it is not uncommon to hear the unmistakable cry of the North American loon or to see bald eagles, hawks, salmon and deer. Halfway along this route you will notice a change in the vegetation along the riverbanks from fresh water plants to orange colored seaweed. From this point you will be paddling above of clam-flats and may witness the effects of the ocean tide. Along the shore, just before reaching Sonora, you will pass by a clam processing factory and old derelict buildings. At this point you will hear the crash of the Atlantic waves and will see the breakwater at Sonora that is a great place to exit the water.


Isaacs Harbour (Goldboro to Red Head) Paddle Route

From the TC 104, take exit 35 traveling Route 316 toward St. Andrews and Goldboro. Passing through the communities of Country Harbour and Stormont, you will arrive at the Isaacs Harbour intersection. At this point make a sharp left turn and travel to the Goldboro Interpretive Center where you will find a great spot to launch beside the wharf.

Special Features:

The communities of Isaacs Harbour and Goldboro face one another across a deep water harbour that once was the major centre for shipping in Guysborough County. Goldboro was once a thriving mining community, and many abandoned mines are scattered throughout. In recent years, Goldboro has seen the revival of economic growth with the completion of the Sable Offshore Energy Project, bringing ashore the first sample of natural gas in Atlantic Canada in 1999. The Goldboro Interpretive Centre provides excellent displays of artifacts from the two communities, and pays special tribute to the area’s industrial past and present. This paddle route incorporates the peninsula known as Red Head, that was used by early Black Loyalists as a burial ground. This early cemetery underwent archaeological excavation and forensic assessment during the summer of 2001, due to the exposure and loss of graves from the eroding effects of the Atlantic tides.

Length: 13 km return
Time: 5 Hours
Type: Tidal, saltwater, harbour
Facilities: Interpretive centre, picnic, tables, garbage cans, toilets, payphone
Nearby: Goldboro, Stormont
Rating: Intermediate

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Isaac's HarbourLaunching from the Goldboro Interpretive Centre, paddle toward the mouth of the harbour. Staying close to the shoreline, you will view old derelict buildings that once housed shops and factories , and remain as reminders of the thriving industrial past of this area. Continuing on you will pass Hurricane Island, adjacent to which, is a small cove; the perfect place to rest or swim. It is important to check tide times as there is an exposed bar of land that appears between this island and the mainland at low tide. Beyond Hurricane Island you will approach Red Head where the effects of the pounding Atlantic Ocean can be marveled from the water’s edge. On the return trip, you will paddle across the open water to the community of Isaacs Harbour, where the shore is lined with old abutments that once supported wharves bustling with activity. At the harbour mouth is the Isaacs Harbour lighthouse that was established in 1874. Rounding a cove at the base of the harbour, return toward the interpretive centre, which marks the end of this paddle route. Please note that in times of inclement weather, the water can be rough and caution should be exercised.


Guysborough Waterfront to Milford Haven River Paddle Route

From the TC 104, take exit 37 to Monastery and Guysborough onto Route 16. Follow this road into the village of Guysborough onto Main Street. Proceed to the end of Main Street where you will turn right onto the Church Street extension. At the bottom of a short hill is a small cove that is the perfect place to put your boat in the water.

Special Features:

Guysborough, the shire town and county’s namesake, was settled by a group of American Loyalists headed by Sir Guy Carleton in 1784. With a vast cultural and industrial history, this site was occupied by Mi’kmaq, Acadian, French, German and British peoples prior to this time. In more recent years the historic Guysborough waterfront has been restored giving new life to the old buildings, in an attempt to preserve Guysborough’s mercantile history and to encourage travelers to visit. The area through which the Milford Haven River flows, was a traditional logging route and is one of few tidal rivers in the county.

Length: 17 km, one-way
Time: Full day
Type: Tidal, saltwater river, harbour
Facilities: Garbage cans, picnic tables, toilets at Guysborough waterfront and Boylston Provincial Park
Nearby: Boylston, village of Guysborough
Rating: Intermediate

Description:

pic_guyswaterfrontomilfordhavenLaunching your boat, you will exit the cove, rounding a small point of land to your left. Paddling toward the Guysborough marina and waterfront development, you will soon have a terrific view of the village of Guysborough. Little Island can be seen ahead to your right where clusters of cormorants, locally known as shags, have made their home. As a consequence of these bird habitations, many of the island’s trees are dead due to their prolonged exposure to bird feces. Along this entire route farms, fields and woodlands greet the shoreline. Once past the village you will arrive at Big Island, and the rolling green grass of the Osprey Shores golf course. Continuing on, you will arrive at Priest Island, which is included as a portion of Boylston Provincial Park and is connected to the mainland via a small causeway. This is the perfect place to have lunch and explore the walking trail encircling the island. Beyond this island, the harbour narrows significantly, and becomes the Milford Haven River. On your approach to the Boylston Bridge, caution must be exercised, as strong tidal currents are often at play. Once under the bridge you glide along slow moving waters which eventually widen providing you with a spectacular view of rolling hills and fields. At the river’s end, you will arrive at grassy tidal flats, where caution must be used, as the grass can prove tricky even to the most experienced paddler. The exit to this paddle route lies approximately 400 metres before the river’s end at a small grassy launch area.


Drum Head to Coddles Harbour Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, follow route 16 approximately 2 km to the Larrys River turn off, where you will turn right onto the road to Larrys River. Where route 16 intersects with route 316, turn right traveling toward Goldboro. Prior to Goldboro you will arrive at Drum Head where Wharf Road leads you to a breakwater, which is a prime spot to launch your boat.

Special Features:

In Drum Head the most significant settlement was established during the mid 1800’s. It is known that the first settlers to arrive were a man and his family who were forced to live their first winter in a hole they dug in the ground. The people who came to this area sustained themselves predominantly by fishing and boat building. The man-made breakwaters still existing today, were built in the 1950’s and served to protect this small fishing community from the intense Atlantic tides. Along this route you will pass by Country Island, which to this day, houses an historic marine aid station and is a popular venue for bird researchers. Coddles Harbour is home to Money, where, legend has it, a large sum of money was once buried.

Length: 7.6 km, one way
Time: 5 Hours
Type: Tidal, saltwater, ocean
Facilities: None
Nearby: Stormont, Larrys River
Rating: Intermediate
Map Click here for print ready map

Description:

Vist Guysborough: Drum Head to Coddles HarbourRounding the Drum Head breakwater, paddle east, passing between Harbour Island and Burk Point. Granite barrens stretch for miles along the shore, which give a sense of remoteness. Amid the rugged beauty of these barrens you may witness bald eagles, terns, hawks, deer and coyotes. Continuing on you will arrive in Seal Harbour, where, on your left are remnants of an historic breakwater. It was in this area where a small community once thrived as well as a prosperous lobster factory and fish drying plant. In Seal Harbour there are several islands to explore as well as sand beaches that are exposed during low tide. Any one of these islands would be the perfect place to stop and have lunch or camp over night. Leaving Seal Harbour, you will round Davidson’s Point en route to Coddles Harbour. Looking out to sea you will pass by Country Island located approximately 5.5 km out. It is possible to explore this island during times of clement weather, but only experienced paddlers should attempt this. Passing between the mainland and Coddles Island you will enter Coddles Harbour. Staying to the left of the island, and rounding a point of land, you will see a small wharf with a boat launch area that marks the end of this journey.


Indian Harbour Lake Paddle Route

From Sherbrooke Village travel east on Highway 7 toward Antigonish. Once through Sherbrooke a sign directs you to Port Bickerton. Turn right at this sign and travel 9.2 km to Indian Harbour Lake. There you will see a restaurant at the entrance to Jigs and Reels Road. Turn right and follow this road until you come to the intersection at Ragged Ass Road. At this point turn right and travel down a grassy path that leads to a boat launch area.

Special Features:

At one time, the area occupied by Indian Harbour Lake consisted entirely of salt water. During times of stormy weather, the surrounding lands would flood, and in 1930 the residents of the area manually altered the route of this waterway. A bar of land was constructed that today houses Port Hilford Beach, and was used to dam the lake behind Indian Harbour. Today this lake is one of Guysborough County’s most pristine cottage country retreats.

Length: 9.4 km return
Time: 5 Hours
Type: Freshwater Lake
Facilities: None
Nearby: Port Bickerton, Sherbrooke
Rating: Novice

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Indian Harbour LakeUpon leaving the boat launch area follow the shoreline to your left. This lake is long and narrow and is lined with beautiful cottages and year round homes. The water in this lake is the colour of deeply brewed tea, which is typical of fresh water lakes in Nova Scotia and is a result of humic acid and decaying leaves. Approximately mid-way along the length of this lake you will encounter a small island consisting mainly of tall grass. Caution should be used in this area, as the water surrounding the island is quite shallow. Nearing the end of the lake you will pass by an old cemetery as you enter into a grassy area. Directly in front of you is a large wooded causeway with tall thickly clustered evergreen trees. It is at this point that you can hear the crashing waves of the Atlantic Ocean that is only a stones throw away. It is possible to get out of your boat at this point and venture to the ocean side at Port Hilford beach. The view from here is spectacular as you gaze out over Indian Harbour. It is not uncommon to see eagles, hawks, sea gulls and varieties of fish along this route. On your return trip you may want to travel along the opposite shoreline and have a closer look at some of the cottage retreats that span the length of the lake. Once near the boat launch area you can continue past a small point of land and enter into an open and serene cove. There are islands in this area that are great for exploring.


Lochiel Lake Paddle Route

From the Trans Canada Highway take exit 32 at Lower West River, following Highway 7 to South Lochaber. Travel 3 km to the entrance to Two Mile Lake Provincial Park. Inside the park, follow the paved road and you will see a grassy boat launch area on the lake’s edge.

Special Features:

Lochiel Lake borders the Two Mile Lake Provincial Park. This lake, as described by the park’s name, is long and narrow and is a great example of one of Guysborough County’s pristine fresh water lakes. The Provincial Park is opened from May to October and is meant for day use only. Camping is not permitted, but this is a quiet and beautiful place to picnic, bird watch, fish, swim or curl up under a tree with a good book.

Length: 6 km loop
Time: 6 Hours
Type: Freshwater lake
Facilities: Picnic tables, toilets, garbage cans, fire pits
Nearby: Sherbrooke, Goshen
Rating: Novice

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Lochiel LakeUpon entering the water, you will be sheltered in a small, serene cove. Leaving this cove, you will head in a westerly direction following close to the shoreline. From this vantage point you will have a great view of the lush plant life and surrounding woods. As you continue in this direction you will pass by the shores of the Provincial Park and may witness wildlife such as deer, bald eagles, various species of fish, frogs, loons and ducks. Lochiel Lake should be paddled as a loop, and you will want to cross to the opposite shores where you will experience seclusion at its best. This lake is home to seasonal cottages and cabins and is the perfect retreat into true Nova Scotian wilderness.


Donahue Lake Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, follow route 16 approximately 2 km to the Larrys River turn off. At this intersection turn right, traveling this road for 7 km to a sign labeled Donahue Lake. Approximately 1.5 km from this sign you will come upon a road on your left leading to a grassy boat launch area.

Special Features:

Donahue Lake borders the western edge of the 10,380 hectare Bonnett Lake Barrens Wilderness Area. This lake was once much smaller, but expanded in size when a dam was constructed to supply energy to the Dickies Brook Power Station. Today, this large and pristine lake can be explored by boat, offering a fantastic view of the windswept granite barrens that surround it.

Length: 14 km loop
Time: Full day
Type: Freshwater lake
Facilities: none
Nearby: Larry’s River, Village of Guysbrough
Rating: Novice

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Donahue LakeLaunching your boat at the northwest edge of Donahue Lake, you will proceed in a southerly direction along the shoreline. This lake is long and narrow in shape, and the best views are achieved closest to the shore. The colour of the lake, is typical of most fresh water lakes in Nova Scotia, and can be murky at times. Against the lightness of the granite boulders, the liquid will resemble brewed tea, while foam found near the lake’s edges demonstrate the notorious “softness” of our waters. Caution should be used, as there are some well-hidden rocks and boulders. Continuing south, you will arrive at the end of a long, deep inlet. This area tends to be grassy and shallow with underwater obstacles. Traveling northwest out of this inlet you will round a point of land. Through a narrow passageway you will encounter several other small inlets and coves. This section of the route feels very remote and secluded surrounded by the Bonnet Lake barrens. The landscape includes coastal spruce, fir, evidence of glaciation, raised bogs and rare plants. At the furthest end of this inlet you will reach Big Cove. You will notice a beautiful crushed stone beach, that is a perfect spot to land your boat for a respite, or to explore the wilderness area around you. On the opposite side of the beach is another smaller lake that could be explored at your leisure. Following the barren coast you will make your return trip north along the eastern edge of the lake. Caution should be used during times of inclement weather due to the large size of Donahue Lake. Windy weather in particular can make this difficult paddle.


Little Harbour to Tor Bay Trail

Traveling east along Route 16 from the village of Guysborough, turn right at the Larrys River turnoff, onto the road toward Larrys River. Travel approximately 30 km to Larrys River, and 5 km beyond, arriving at a stop sign. Turn left toward Tor Bay Provincial Park, leaving your vehicle in the public parking lot. Exit the parking lot, walking in the direction from which you just
came. Approximately 200 meters along, you will reach a gravel opening to a road on your left. This is the trailhead.

Special Features:

Once the site of an operational cable station, Tor Bay Provincial Park boasts beautiful sandy beaches and clear ocean water. The remains of Little Harbour recall a time when this area was once a thriving summer fishing village used by the fishermen of Tor Bay and surrounding communities. The men would stay in the village all summer, landing their catch preparing the fish for winter use, or for market. The women and children left behind to maintain the homes and gardens would make frequent walks to the village delivering supplies. Abandoned and left as a ghost town, it has recently suffered the ravages of a fierce Atlantic storm.

Length: 4.5 km loop
Time: 3 Hours
Type: Coastal, gravel road
Facilities: Picnic tables, garbage cans, toilets, benches
Nearby: Village of Guysborough
Rating: 4

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Little Harbour to Tor BayAlong the initial portion of this hike, you will follow the well-marked road to the breakwater at Little Harbour. The brush-lined path transitions from gravel to a packed earthen trail which eventually branches into a “Y”. Maintain a left hand course. Nearing the end of the road you will notice increasing amounts of debris entangled by the overgrown meadows. As you are greeted by the crashing waves and salt spray of Little Harbour, remains of several buildings and a shattered wharf can be seen, including large pieces of roof and flooring. Until being hit by a devastating winter storm in January 2000, some of these buildings remained standing. Beyond the breakwater, the hike now takes you over headlands and coastline. Approximately 3.5 km along, the rocky coastline becomes separated from the land by a large saltwater pool. There are many scenic views from the bluffs along the way, including cranberry bogs, marsh flowers and rock formations. A more intimate view will delight you with seashells, sandpipers and snails. Upon reaching the vast, sandy beaches of Tor Bay, take a moment to breathe the ocean and
taste the air, prior to exploring the Park pavilion and picnic areas. New boardwalks have been built following the 2000 storm, but quiet remains of the former are left as reminders of the power of nature.