recreation
Below you can see listed all of the Breeders registered with the Purebred Sheep Breeders Association of Nova Scotia who breed recreation.

Sonora Point to Fury Wreck

Located on Highway 7 between Sherbrooke Village and the community of Liscomb is Gegogan Road. Traveling this road you will pass by a local landfill site. Continue past this site and traverse the road for approximately 10 km until you arrive at an iron gate. Although this is a public access road, local residents have it gated for security reasons. You may park outside this gate and begin your hike at this point. Once past the gate you will come to another road on the right. Follow this road and head toward the shoreline.

Special Features:

The most fascinating feature of this hike is the shipwreck Fury. On December 2nd, 1964 a strong gale blew the Fury onto a land bar just off the coast of Gegogan Point. Stranded, the Fury remains in its final resting place to this day. A large steel hulled freighter, the Fury had a gross tonnage of 3000. At the time of its demise, the Fury’s Captain Pateras was sailing from Quebec City to Newfoundland. The ship was built in Homburg, Germany in 1944 but was registered to Libya in 1964. All of the people on board the Fury survived, simply simply walked from the ship onto the nearby beach. The Fury can still be accessed today at low tide.

Length: 6 km return
Time: 3 Hours
Type: Coastal, beach rock
Facilities: None
Nearby: Liscomb, Sherbrooke
Rating: 3 (large rocks)

Description:

pic_sonorapointtofuryLeaving your vehicle, you will climb over the iron gate that serves as a roadblock to unknown vehicular traffic, and walk along the first road branching off to your right. following this dirt road, you will next veer off to the left, walking through the tall beach grass to the rocky coastline. Upon reaching the beach, follow the shoreline to your left. Although this hike is a short distance of 6 km return, the rocky condition of the beach may slow your course significantly. Along the route you will have a spectacular view of the crashing Atlantic Ocean to your right and eroding bluffs to your left, which may be an ideal place for fossil hounding. There remains a great deal of evidence along the beach, as a reminder of the spectacle you are about to behold. Tattered structural components, and rusted iron megaliths pay tribute to the Fury and remind us of the ocean’s wrath. Continuing on you will round Burns Point and placing you in view of the wreck. Loose rocks being tossed by ocean forces, have created a natural ridge atop which you will balance as you make your way to the land bar where the disintegrating Fury is beached. You may either retrace your path on your return, or opt to climb the grassy hill overlooking the bay, where you will find a dirt road linking you to the road where your vehicle is parked.


Upper St Marys River to Sherbrooke Village Paddle Route

From Sherbrooke, travel 16 km east on Highway 7 to Melrose. Turn left onto Route 348 towards Glenelg, New Glasgow and Caledonia. Travel 28 km to Caledonia and launch from the Caledonia bridge.

Special Features:

St. Mary’s River took its name from Fort St. Marie, built by the French in 1654, in what is now the lower end of Sherbrooke Village. Erected to protect both French fishermen and fur traders along these shores, the fort was captured by the British in the late 1660’s. A British regiment is reported to have spent the winter in tents along the river between Sherbrooke and Sonora, an area that became known as Canvas Town. Sherbrooke, the trade center of the area, was a community built on the fortunes of timber, gold and tall ships. The river was the main source of industry and transportation for many years, providing a good livelihood to many families for generations. Salmon fishing has always been prominent on this river and continues to attract anglers from all over the world. Many prominent people have spent their vacations on and about the St. Marys River, including English nobility, politicians and sports figures, including Babe Ruth! Today, tourism remains a key industry for this region rich in history and natural beauty.

Length: 40.4 km one-way
Time: 2 days
Type: Freshwater River
Facilities: None
Nearby: Sherbrooke
Rating: Experienced

Description:

Visit Guysborough: St Mary's RiverEntering the water at the bridge in Caledonia, the first section of this route (approximately 22 km) will be along West River St. Mary’s, the western branch of the upper section of the St. Mary’s River. Much of the land along this part of the river is privately owned and you will notice several areas where tree harvesting has taken place. The areas surrounding this region are prime woodlands and home to most Nova Scotia wildlife species. Be observant of salmon, deer and moose along the way. The river will wind and turn for several kilometres, passing through the villages of Upper Smithfield and Glenelg.

As you pass beyond Glenelg, watch for another branch of the river on your right. This is East River St. Marys, the sister branch of the river. At this point, the two branches merge and the remainder of the trip follows the main portion of the St. Mary’s River. Moving in a southeasterly direction, the river straightens and flows toward Waternish.

Between Waternish and Stillwater, the river is flanked within a short distance by Highway 7 on your left, and a local highway on your right.


Sugar Islands Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, travel east on Route 16. Turn right onto Route 316 at the  junction, continuing 14 km to Port Felix. The launch site for this paddle route is the Port Felix wharf located on the left side of the road.

Special Features:

The Sugar Islands are part of the protective barrier guarding Tor Bay. This small grouping of islands offers diverse terrain, from forested to barren, and are home to many sea mammals including the large grey and harbour seals, terns, eider ducks and great blue herons. Whales, dolphins and porpoises can occasionally be seen frolicking in the waters further offshore. Bald eagles and osprey are common, and the rare black vulture can sometimes be seen soaring overhead. These islands have been documented as being among the earliest European fishing stations in Nova Scotia dating as early as 1565. The villages of Tor Bay, Larrys River, Charlos Cove, Cole Harbour, Port Felix and Whitehead all look out over the waters surrounding the Sugar Islands. These islands are easily accessible to the public and provide excellent venues camping.

Length: 12 km loop
Time: Full Day
Type: Tidal, saltwater, ocean
Facilities:  None
Nearby: Larry’s River, Village of Guysborough
Rating: Experienced
Map Click here for print ready map

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Sugar IslandsFrom the Port Felix wharf paddle south along the eastern side of Patate Island. Keeping this island to your right, take time to paddle along the shoreline, exploring the water’s edge. Continuing out to Sugar Harbour, stay to the inside of Hog Island on your left. The water on the opposite side of this island can be treacherous at times and should be avoided. Breakers crashing on the shore and rolling waves are common on the outside shores of this bay. Paddle westward around the outside of Tanner Island where exploration is encouraged. Beyond Tanner Island, paddle to the inside of Dorts Island and back out around the outside of Larrys Island. Keeping Passage Island and Western Island to your right, paddle around the end point of Western Island and begin the return trip to the mainland. Remember to stay on the inside edge of the islands for safety. These islands have sand beaches and protected woods that are perfect for overnight camping. It is highly advisable to have a map of the islands with you when attempt this route.


Whitehead Harbour Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough travel east on Route 16 toward Whitehead. Turn right onto Route 316 at the junction and continue to Marshalls Cove in Whitehead. Watch for a road marked Foxberry by the Sea Bed & Breakfast. Follow this road beyond the bed and breakfast to a small grassy road on the right that leads you to the water. This will serve as both the launch and exit site.

Special Features:

Whitehead Harbour has exceptionally deep waters and is sufficiently large to harbour many ships. Founded in 1655 by the French, and named Tête Blanche it was known to the English as Whitehead or Whitehaven. During the 1860’s, fishermen shortened their trips between Whitehead and Port Felix by hauling their boats over the narrow beach to the opposite cove, thus intimately referred to as The Haul Over. One of the earliest co-op fishing industries in Nova Scotia was developed in Whitehead in 1928 when four fishermen decided to combat hard times and low prices by combining forces and selling directly to the Boston market. With an abundance of islands, coves, passageways and a jagged coastline, Whitehead Harbour was a smuggler’s paradise. Referred to as Martingot by pirates from the mid 1600’s to the late 1700’s, Whitehead Harbour was later used during Nova Scotia’s prohibition period of the 1920’s, by rum-runners who found seclusion and profit amidst the enshrouding fog.

Length: 16 km return
Time: 7.5 hours
Type: Tidal, saltwater, ocean
Facilities: None
Nearby: Canso
Rating: Experienced
Map Click here for print ready map

Description:

Begin your paddle across Whitehead Harbour and along the northern shore of Harbour Island, exploring its jagged coastline and sheltered coves. Entering the basin, you will find a cove Visit Guysboroug: Whitehead Harbourabundant with waterfowl. Close to the waterline is an old cellar, a remnant from the early settlers in the area. Continue paddling the shoreline of Yankee Cove and around Yankee Island, passing along the Canso Coastal Barrens Wilderness Area, a Nova Scotia protected wilderness site. Venturing toward the open ocean, you will arrive at Three Top Island, beyond which, you will gain a good view of Whitehead Island. Using caution as you cross the exposed and often rough Atlantic waters, you will next enter a sheltered cove at Dogfish Point on the northwest tip of the island. At the southern tip of the island is the Whitehead lighthouse that may be accessed by the water or by foot over the island. Throughout this route, there are several other small islands that may be explored. As you return to the mainland, maintain caution amongst the many hidden reefs and shoals.


Salmon River Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, follow Route 16 east to the Larrys River turn off, where you will turn right onto the road to Larrys River. Approximately 200 metres along, turn right toward Country Harbour. Continue 18 km to the iron bridge at Salmon River Lake where you will launch your boat.

Special Features:

This breathtaking paddle traverses one of Guysborough County’s longest and most historic rivers. During the 1920s, the Salmon River was a major logging route to Cooks Cove, where several saw mills were located. Here, large ships awaited their loads of timber for transport along the Eastern Seaboard and to South America. The last log drive down this river occurred in 1947, by the Minas Basin Company. Although narrow, this river is deep enough to provide great snorkeling opportunities along its entire length. Paddling this route is best during
the early spring and late fall, as water levels tend to fluctuate.

Length: 26 km one way
Time: Full Day
Type: Freshwater river
Facilities: None
Nearby: Village of Guysborough
Rating: Experienced

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Salmon RiverEntering the water at the Salmon River Lake bridge, paddle east, flowing with the natural current of the river. The passage alternately widens and narrows as it twists and winds its way through beautiful wilderness country. Often swinging across and alongside the Trans Canada Trail, the river occasionally finds sanctuary beneath a canopy of trees. As you move along, be watchful for the variety of wildlife that depend on this river for survival, including deer, moose, black bears, hawks, eagles and rabbits. Ambling down river, you will soon be paddling between the settlements of North Ogden and Ogden where the river occasionally widens, forming several salmon pools. Passing under the McAllister suspension bridge at Ogden, continue to the settlement of West Roachvale, where homes are visible along the shoreline. En route to the next settlement of Roachvale, there are four prominent islands located mid-river which tempt an explorative spirit. Along the final 3 km stretch beyond Roachvale, you will arrive at the Salmon Hole, a popular local swimming spot and a good place to catch a glimpse of the great Atlantic salmon. From the Salmon Hole you will pass the Dickies Brook power station and travel behind Hortons Cove. Use caution in this area as this portion of the river is tidal and seaweed often crowds the water. Follow the natural channel towards the open Atlantic ocean, passing under an iron bridge that spans Route 16, and landing your boat at Salmon River Beach. A return trip is not recommended, as the current in this river is strong and steady. A pick up vehicle can be parked in the beach parking area. Salmon River


Queensport to Fogarty Head Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, travel east on Route 16 to Queensport. The Queensport Beach is located off the main road on the left and can be recognized by an interpretive panel and rest area. This will serve as both the launch and exit point.

Special Features:

Queensport Beach is an interpretive site dedicated to the history of the Queensport light station located 2 km off Queensport, on Rock Island. Originally erected in 1882, the light station was manned until 1968. It was one of the earlier light stations to become fully automated and still flashes a beacon to welcome travelers to Chedabucto Bay. Only a few kilometers away the Out of the Fog Lighthouse Museum displays the history and tales of this light station and others in the area.

Length: 20 km return
Time: 7.5 Hours
Type: Tidal, saltwater, ocean
Facilities: Port-a-potties, garbage cans
Nearby: Canso, Village of Guysborough
Rating: Experienced
Map Click here for print ready map

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Queensport to Fogarty HeadEntering the water at Queensport Beach, paddle eastward along the granite shores to Brody Point. Cranes and sandpipers may be seen, as well as a multitude of seagulls and other waterfowl. The Queensport Beach marks the mouth of a small tributary, which offers a spectacular view in fall, with its surrounding deciduous trees. Looking back across Chedabucto Bay you may be able to identify the communities of Port Shoreham and St. Francis Harbour. Continuing on you will enter a small cove at Philips Harbour. A picturesque area, the harbour itself is protected by Philips Head. A few kilometres along the coast, you will arrive at Half Island Cove. A very wide cove, this area boasts not one, but two separate sand beaches. Rounding Gaulman Point, continue paddling along the shore toward Fogarty Head, which has become a more widely recognized name over the past decade due to the popularity of Stan Rogers’ music and the annual Stan Rogers Folk Festival that is held in Canso. In more recent years, efforts are being made to preserve a portion of this route as a natural retreat. From Fogarty Head and nearby Black Point you will be able to look to the northeast toward Cape Breton, with a view of Isle Madame and Petit-de-Gras Island. Upon reaching Fogarty Head, you may retrace your route to Queensport Beach, or having made transportation arrangements, continue on past Black Point and Fox Bay Beach exiting the water at Fox Island Main Beach. It is important to take a map along this route to help identify the many coves and inlets. Please note that the water along the shore of Chedabucto Bay can be rough during times of inclement weather.


Dover Shrine Trail

Following Hwy 16 east, turn right onto the road to Little Dover. Entering the village, continue straight until you reach St. Agnes Parish on your right, where you may park your vehicle. Facing the church, and walking to the left, you will find the grassy path at the back left corner of the property.

Special Features:

St. Agnes Shrine, 14 Stations of the Cross

Length: 2 km return
Time: 2 Hours
Type: Forest path, ATV trail
Facilities: None
Nearby: Canso
Rating: 3

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Dover ShrineAt the trail head there are discarded items to the side, which should not discourage you from continuing. Soon along the trail you reach a plateau highlighted by exposed granite amongst berry patches. Here the path branches in two directions. The path to the left is a side trail which will take you to the site of the shrine. Following the trail through the fields and brush, you will soon come to an arched bridge, bringing into view the garden arbor introducing the site of St. Agnes shrine site. A natural rock structure serves as a platform which cradles a statue of the Virgin Mary which is showing signs of age of weather. A sense of times long since past washes over you as you gaze upon the fading and peeling painted likeness, humbled amongst the tangled thorns and branches of encroaching brush. A well to the side holds water where individuals may bless themselves, and a bench looks away from the shrine towards the village below. Leaving the site you will notice a mossy overgrown path to the left, further identified by a roman numeral one posted on a tree a short distance in. This path counts the fourteen Stations of the Cross as it curves along a steep embankment. At the top of the hill the path opens upon a gusty summit where stands a large cross cabled to a boulder. Towards the back of the boulder, a ladder is securely bolted, where explorers may climb to gain a spectacular panoramic view of the local area. Overlooking the village of Little Dover, the hill is encompassed by Snyders Lake, Moose Lake, Kavanaughs Lake and Dover Lake, as well as Dover Harbour which stretches out towards the Atlantic.


Glasgow Head to Little Dover Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, follow Route 16 into the town of Canso. Continue down Main Street, turn right onto Union Street, and travel approximately 3 km to Glasgow Head where you will arrive at a sheltered cove to the left at Betsy’s Beach.

Special Features:

Glasgow Head is historically known as a Direction Finding Station since 1917, and recently known as a popular swimming spot for residents of Canso, and as a campsite for those enjoying the annual Stan Rogers Festival. Along this paddle route, you will enjoy a view of the Canso Coastal Barrens Wilderness Area, granite coves, beautiful “teal” waters, fishing huts, nearby Chapel Gully hiking trail, and relics of the Western Union Company and the Commercial Cable Company in Canso & Hazel Hill.

Length: 12 km, one-way
Time: 5 hours
Type: Tidal, saltwater, ocean
Facilities: None
Nearby: Canso
Rating: Intermediate *** due to tides and exposure to weather,caution must be used
Map Click here for print ready map

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Glassgow Head to Little DoverLeaving Glasgow Head you will have a clear view of Cranberry Island, where a lighthouse was built in 1816 to serve the fishermen moving between Canso and the fishing grounds. Rounding Betsys Point, you will have the opportunity to view pods of curious seals who may playfully follow while in this sheltered cove. As you next traverse Andrews Passage, a granite bottom allows a clear view of the wondrous ocean flora and fauna. While traversing this passage you will begin to gain a view of the open ocean. Looking to the far left, you may see the Canso Islands, and to the right, sheltered coves such as Three Island cove, Portage cove, and Negrowac Cove which are a must to explore. The water along this route remains shallow, and there are shoals and small islands upon which tufts of grass and scraggy trees cling for life. Any one of these islands is the perfect spot to stop for a rest. Continuing on and rounding Madeline Point you will arrive at Little Dover Run. The village of Little Dover is sustained by an unrelenting determination of its people for whom fishing is almost second nature. Landing your boat on the inside of a man made breakwater there is a lovely park, Black Duck Cove, to be enjoyed.


Canso Islands Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, follow Route 16 into theCanso. Continue down Main Street, turn right onto Union Street, and continue to an intersection. Turning left toward the water, you will see the boat launch beside a large government wharf.

Special Features:

The several islands off the coast of Canso have, for generations, played an important role in the settlement and operation of this small community. In recent years these islands are being recognized for their historical significance on a larger national and international scale. As early as the 1500’s Basque and French fishermen were exploiting the rich offshore banks, while using the rocky shores of these islands for drying their catch. Generations prior to this, Mi’kmaq used this area for their own subsistence practices.

Length: 10 km, return
Time: Full day
Type: Tidal, saltwater, ocean
Facilities: None
Nearby: Canso
Rating: Intermediate
Map Click here for print ready map

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Canso IslandsLeaving the boat launch site, and paddling past the government wharf on your left, you will see Durell Island, which is connected to the mainland via a small causeway. Directly ahead of you is Hart Island, which is home to a marine aid station. Paddling between, to the left of Hart Island and to the right of Durell, head out into the open Atlantic Ocean. As you navigate, seek greater security by keeping your boat close to the islands. You will notice clear sandy bottom and catch glimpses of scattered sand dollars, and tufts of seaweed along the way. Rounding Hart Island and passing over Long Point Ledges, another large island known as Piscatiqui comes into view. Here you will find a peaceful cove with a sandy beach that is the perfect place to have a rest or explore the barren granite shoreline. To the left of Piscatiqui Island is Hog Island. A wide channel between the two will lead you into George’s Harbour. In this rugged and secluded area, you may notice pairs of shiny black eyes peering above the surface, as pods of friendly and curious seals may playfully accompany you on your journey. Among the many small islands to be explored are, Walsh, Barry’s Rock, Pigeon, Big Gooseberry, Little Gooseberry and The Goose. Beyond these smaller islands are a larger grouping called the Derabies, which are also excellent for exploration. Paddling back toward the entrance to George’s Harbour, you will find on your left, the opening to a long, serene corridor through smooth walls of granite. This quiet passage spills into the cove behind Grassy Island National Historic Site. From here, make your way back across the open water to the Canso.


Cooeycoff Run Paddle Route

From the village of Guysborough, travel approximately 27 km east on Route 16, turning right onto Route 316 at the junction. Travel approximately 300m, to a trail along your right. There are parking areas to either side of the road where you may leave your vehicle and begin traveling by foot. You will walk 3-5 minutes to the water where you begin your paddle.

Special Features:

This route is a series of connecting lakes that lie midway between the Bonnett Lake Barrens Wilderness Area and the Canso Coastal Barrens Wilderness Area. With its abundant wildlife, you may catch a glimpse of bear, moose or deer. Waterfowl are plentiful as well as eagles and hawks. This area is wooded but has marshland throughout. In season, fishing is permitted on these lakes.

Length: 26 km return
Time: Full day
Type: Freshwater Lake
Facilities: None
Nearby: Canso
Rating: Intermediate

Description:

Visit Guysborough: Cooeycoff RunEntering the water, you will paddle along a narrow passage which connects the series of lakes along this route. You will first arrive Mayflower Lake where paddling is easy. This body of water being small, you will soon be back along the connecting waterway. Next arriving at the tip of Panhandle Lake, you will have greater opportunity to explore. Larger in size, you may take time to paddle around its perimeter, investigating its many nooks along the irregular shoreline. Toward the southern end of this lake, caution should be used as you navigate around a small but beautiful waterfall. Next you will enter Allen’s Lake, a very picturesque pool, leading to Cooeycoff Lake, which is the largest body of water in this series. Here, there are many coves, inlets, stream beds and rocky outcrops to admire and enjoy. With several small islands near the lake’s edge, fishing are in abundance. Leaving Cooeycoff Lake, it will be necessary to portage a short distance around a large waterfall, paddling next to Sand Lake. Although much smaller than Cooeycoff Lake, it is equally majestic. The island in the center of the lake is a good place to stop and relax, and perhaps enjoy a picnic lunch. As you continue your paddle you will arrive at Trout Lake. This is the final lake on this run, and places you within the boundaries of the Bonnett Lake Wilderness Area. Once you have explored Trout Lake, you will begin your way back, retracing your path to the starting point.